Here's Why A Great Customer Service Resume Is So Important

We live in an age where finding a job can be one of the most challenging things you’ll ever have to do. At the moment of this writing, the unemployment rate in the United States is 6.2%.  It’s getting better as the days pass, but time is luxury that most of us don’t have when it comes to employment.

To make matters a little stickier, the field of “customer service” is overrun with potential applicants.  Though customer service jobs are lucrative–as a category, it’s one of the largest employment fields in America–the best ones will always be competitive.  You’ll be up against a crowd of equally eager prospective candidates, many of whom will share your exact qualifications. Here’s the good news: even though you may automatically be at a “disadvantage” when it comes to sheer numbers, you can still stand out with a great customer service resume.

A well made customer service resume is important.  It can make the difference between a regular applicant and a great applicant.  So put in the work–strive to be the latter.

The Importance of a Great Customer Service Resume

Closeup of a cute business woman with headset at workplace

Have you ever gone to an interview wearing an old pair of jeans and a torn t-shirt? Or in sneakers and a pair of shorts? Of course not! You know that dressing properly is a must if you want to be successful. However, how many of us forget that resumes are as important as interviews! Sending out resumes that are difficult to read, messy, and ambiguous in nature is an act similar to going to the interview dressed in casual attire.

Remember that your customer service resume is your only chance to make a first good impression. If your resume is not up to snuff, prospective employers are going to give somebody else a shot.  When you design your resume, you need to do it with strategy in mind.  For instance, if you’re applying for a customer service representative position, you need to outline the fact that you love working with people, you are patient, you know how to treat those around you, and you are persuasive when talking to potential customers.Use Your Resume to Highlight Skills and Attributes

When building your customer service resume, think about the skills that future employers will be looking for.  Give them a chance to see how well you’ll fit with their business before snagging an interview.  Here are some things you should consider including:

  • Previous experience related to customer service.
  • Impact you made on your previous companies’ sales.
  • A list of your honors and achievements.
  • Specific projects and task you participated in.

Remember this: the goal of writing a top-notch customer service resume is to get as many interview invitations as possible. The more interviews you have, the higher the chances you have at snagging a job you’re going to want.

Achievements and Previous Experience

If you really want your resume to set you apart from other applicants, you need to make sure it communicates your relevant experience and unique skills. Employers such as popular UK company The Contact want to be sure that you can provide service that exceeds the expectations of their customer.  They also want to ensure that you understand the importance of your work, as you will ultimately identify with the corporation you’re working for.

If the position you apply for involves sales, you should mention your confidence and outgoing nature, complemented by your strong determination to achieve measurable results. Remember, employers aren’t interested in people looking for another job, They’re searching for employees dedicated to providing top-notch customer service.

A high-volume workload means that you can perform well under pressure. If you know you can meet performance benchmarks, such as volume, accuracy and speed, do not hesitate to mention them in your resume.  Don’t hesitate to include facts and figures that relate to your department. For instance, write down how many customers you have converted over a period of one month or how many customers gave you a 5-star feedback. It is inevitable that you may have had to deal with difficult customers. If you have managed to transform a disastrous situation into one with positive outcome, do not forget to add that to your resume.

customer-service.0822.12

However, if you have no experience whatsoever in customer service, try to find out those moments when you demonstrated some of these skills in “real world” scenarios. You may provide examples of volunteer, personal or community work that demonstrates your strong desire to go above and beyond.

Well Made Parts to a Great Whole

A well-made customer service resume can definitely set you apart from other applicants, allowing you to win that well-deserved position in the best company on the market.  Make sure you take the time and plan your resume out before turning it in.  When you’re ready to take the next step, check out the following articles and learn how to make the individual parts of your resume.

How to Dress for a Customer Service Job Interview

So here you are.  You have taken the time to make a great resume, you sent it in, and now you’ve been called back for a job interview.  Just like that, it seems as if the worst part of it all is now behind you.

Ha, just kidding.  While a resume is a crucial first step towards getting that customer service job that you’ve always dreamed of, it’s still only the first step.  Getting the attention of a prospective employer is important, but the job interview is where you really need to shine.  And since first impressions are key, you’re going to need to know how to dress for a job interview.

How Formal Do I Have to Dress for a Job Interview?

Businesspeople with various facial expressions

It’s important to look your best for a job interview.  With that said, customer service jobs aren’t always going to be on the same level as other professional jobs.  If you’re interviewing for a job at, say, a quick service restaurant or a casual mall retail store, don’t worry about going out and spending your hard earned money on a suit.  There is such a thing as overkill.

Still, you should still look as professional as possible for a job interview.  If you’re unsure as to what is expected of you, it’s perfectly okay to ask a manager or a current employee what you should wear.

If that’s not something you’re comfortable doing, then it’s okay to visit the business and “spy” on what the current employees are wearing on the job.  Keep in mind that this isn’t alway the most effective way to get an idea as to how to dress for a job interview, since certain jobs require their employees to dress in casual attire (for example, a clothing retail store).

At the end of the day, it’s better to be safe than sorry.  If you don’t want to do the research, then go ahead and follow the instruction below.

How Men Should Dress for a Job Interview

A conservative look is usually the way to go for a job interview, and men have it the easiest when it comes to this since there isn’t much in the way of variation.Shirt: long sleeved, collared, solid color.  Black, white and blue are always excellent, safe bets.Pants: slacks.  Black and dark grey usually match with most shirts.  Khaki is also an option if you are wearing a black shirt.Tie: solid color or limited design.  It should match the shirt and pants.  Make sure the tie you choose doesn’t have an obtrusive logo.Shoes: black or dark brown professional shoes.Belt: a basic belt with a standard-sized buckle.  Here’s a biggie: make sure that it matches the shoes.  Black shoes go with a black belt, brown shoes go with a brown belt.Socks: dark colored.  Whatever you do, don’t wear white socks, as they are considered unprofessional.

How Women Should Dress for a Job Interview

For better or for worse, women have a few more options when it comes to dressing for a customer service job interview.  Though it’s still important to stay conservative with job interview attire, women have a little more room to add variation. Wear clean and neatly pressed clothes. Consider wearing a conservative skirt or a tailored dress pant alongside a professionally looking blouse with small pattern or a solid color.Accessories and shoes.  Limit your accessories when going for an interview. Consider wearing a trim belt, a conservative tie, a watch, low-heeled pumps or leather flat shoes, and simple earrings.Hair and nails.  Make sure that your hair is clean, neatly styled and off of your face.  Keep your nails neatly polished or short, clean and neat.

Leave the Jeans at Home

JobInterview

Let’s talk about what you should never wear to a job interview.  Jeans, t-shirts and other casual types of clothing should never be considered.  This includes hats, chains, sneakers, and sunglasses as well.

Though this may sound obvious, you’d be surprised at to how many people think it’s perfectly fine to wear their everyday attire to an interview.  As a former manager at a fast food restaurant, I encountered several “prospective” employees who showed up to their interview dressed as if they wanted to hang out with me.  They didn’t get called back.

Moral of the story: even if the job is within the range of minimum wage, casual clothing is a no-no.  It’s okay if you didn’t know this–now you do, so make sure to not repeat the mistakes of your competition.

Making a Great Customer Service Resume

We live in a world and age where finding a job can be one of the most challenging you’ll ever have to do. At the moment of this writing, the unemployment rate in the United States is 6.2%, although other sources claim that it may be even higher–somewhere between 15 and 20%.  Combine a huge amount of applicants with a high unemployment rate, and the importance of writing a top-notch customer service resume becomes obvious.Problems you May Face

When applying for a customer service position, both recruiters and applicants have a few problems that they may encounter. Some of these issues are:

  • Way too many applicants.
  • Similar job applications among candidates.
  • Hard to differentiate; problems to decide who is the most qualified person.

This is why a well-made customer service resume is so important – it can make the difference between a regular applicant and a great applicant. You need to remember that your resume is the way companies see you. Even though you might be extremely hard-working, diligent and quite clever, if you are unable to show all these into your resume, you will most likely be left behind.

The Importance of a Great Customer Service Resume

Woman Wearing Headset in Office
Woman Wearing Headset in Office

Have you ever gone to an interview wearing an old pair of jeans and a torn t-shirt? Or some sneakers and a pair of shorts? Of course not! You know that dressing up properly is a must if you want to be successful. However, how many of us forget that resumes are as important as interviews! Sending out resumes that are hard-to-read and messy is similar to going to the interview dressed in sneakers and shorts.

Remember that your customer service resume is your only chance to make a first good impression. If your resume is not up to snuffs, no one will call you to an interview. Hence, when you design your resume, you need to do it with strategy in mind. For instance, if you apply for a customer service representative position, you need to outline the fact that you love working with people, you are patient, you know how to treat those around you, and you are persuasive when talking to potential customers.

Use Your Resume to Highlight Skills and Attributes

When building your customer service resume, think about the skills that future employers will be looking for.  Give them a chance to see how well you’ll fit with their business before snagging an interview.  Make sure you include these attributes as well:

  • Previous experience related to customer service.
  • Impact you made on your previous companies’ sales.
  • A list of your honors and achievements.
  • Specific projects and task you participated in.

Remember this: the goal of writing a top-notch customer service resume is to get as many interview invitations as possible. The more interviews you have, the higher the chances you have at snagging a job you’re going to want.

Achievements and Previous Experience

If you really want your resume to set you apart from other applicants, you need to make sure it communicates your relevant experience and unique skills. The impression you must give is instant, stating the reasons why you’re an ideal candidate for the customer service position. Employers want to be sure that you can provide super services that exceed the expectations of their customer. They also want to ensure that you understand the importance of your work, as you will ultimatly identify with the corporation you’re working for.

If the position you apply for involves sales, you should mention your confidence and outgoing nature, complemented by your strong determination to achieve measurable results. Remember, employers aren’t interested in people looking for another job, They’re searching for employees dedicated to providing top-notch customer service.

improve-customer-service-big-data_9yPOyAv

A high-volume workload means that you can perform well under pressure. If you know you can meet performance benchmarks, such as volume, accuracy and speed, do not hesitate to mention them in your resume.  Don’t hesitate to include facts and figures that relate to your department. For instance, write down how many customers you have converted over a period of one month or how many customers gave you a 5-star feedback. It is inevitable that you may have had to deal with difficult customers. If you have managed to transform a disastrous situation into one with positive outcome, do not forget to add that to your resume.

However, if you have no experience whatsoever in customer service, try to find out those moments when you demonstrated some of these skills in “real world” scenarios. You may provide examples of volunteer, personal or community work that demonstrates your strong desire to go above and beyond.

Well Made Parts to a Great Whole

A well-made customer service resume can definitely set you apart from other applicants, allowing you to win that well-deserved position in the best company on the market.  Make sure you take the time and plan your resume out before turning it in.  When you’re ready to take the next step, check out the following articles and learn how to make the individual parts of your resume.

5 Customer Service Myths that are Completely Untrue - PART 2

Customer Service Myth #3: Customers expect everything for free

Most customers don’t expect something for nothing because it’s a format that simply doesn’t work.  The entire basis of capitalism in founded on the trading of goods or services for money, and people understand that.  Customers don’t generally expect anything for free.

With that said, some people are swindlers—there’s no denying that—but they are a minority.  The problem here is very similar to myth #2: a tiny percentage of customers don’t play by the rules of society, and for some reason it’s these people that set a hypothetical standard for the general population.  Don’t let them corrupt your way of thinking.

Customer-Service-Representative

One thing to keep in mind—providing things for free isn’t always bad.  For promotional purposes, free samples and the like can be a great way to get paying customers to come back.  You may also come across situations where a refund or other freebies may be tossed around to right a wrong.  These are ideologically different situations from the “everything must be free” mindset, and customers will recognize them for what they are.

Customer Service Myth #4: Unhappy customers will always complain

Customer service providers should always try to make customers happy, and the general idea is that the unhappy ones will let their woes be known.  This concept is generally true, but it leaves out a major factor that should always be considered: the silent customer.  And believe it or not, they’re far worse than vocally unsatisfied one.

Unhappy silent customers won’t complain to you or request to speak to a manager, but two very important things happen when they come into play: first of all, they probably won’t be coming back to you, which is exactly what you don’t want to happen.  And second: you’ll never know what upset them, and therefore won’t be able to apply an easy fix to a potentially damaging situation in the future.

Never assume that all customers will leave your establishment (or get off the phone with you) in a satisfied state of mind.  Talk to them, ask them how things are, and get to the bottom of any issues they might be having.

Customer Service Myth #5: Customers understand how your business works

Portrait Of A Person Holding Happy And Unhappy Mood Board

Businesses are usually complicated entities, and every single one of them runs on their own unique process.  There is no way a customer is going to fully understand the ins and outs of your company, so never assume that they will.  It is the job of a customer service representative to act as the middle-man between a patron and a corporation—always be ready to translate things well to customers so that their experiences are as transparent as possible.

This particular myth is relatively hard to recognize.  A good many of your customers are bound to admit that they have no idea what’s going on, but that doesn’t mean they’re the only ones left in the dark.  Always be wary of customers who act like they know everything, because chances are they really don’t.  At the end of the day, they’ll appreciate your efforts and may even come back for more next time.

5 Customer Service Myths that are Completely Untrue

Most jobs are customer service related, which means they are subject to mob mentality stereotypes.  If you really think about it, such mythological attributes are an obvious development in any given society, and like all non-truths, they can be very harmful.

If “harmful” sounds too dramatic a word for this description, consider this: as humans, we communicate through implied notions.  We hear things to be true, and unless verification exists to contradict these ideas, we accept them as truth—either actively, or subconsciously.

So open your mind and take a look at these five customer service myths and do your best to identify them for what they are—pure nonsense.

Customer Service Myth #1: Customer Service is beneath the affluent.

excellent-customer-service

For some reason, the notion of “customer service” is met with the assumption of a lower economic class.  It’s true that most minimum wage jobs—like fast food and retail—are completely reliant on customer service, but even the wealthiest of employees need to flex their customer service muscles every now and then.  Take doctors for example.  They may not be answering phones, handling money or assisting with paperwork, but they absolutely have to interact with patients—bam!  Customer service.  On a broader scale, look at corporate CEOs.

They may be calling the shots, but they still have to negotiate with outside vendors and other third-party entities in order to keep cash flow in the green.  Look out!  That’s customer service.  How about politicians?  You think those votes come in on their own?  No way—voters are their customers, and they have provide excellent service on a consistent basis if they want to keep their elected positions.I think you get the point.  Customer service isn’t a “job,” it’s a philosophy, and even though a career title may not overtly say “customer service representative,” you’d better believe that there are going to be some customer service skills at play regardless of pay grade.

Customer Service Myth #2: Customers are always out to get you

It’s a classic fallacy: you run into one angry customer who wants you fired, therefore they’re all out to get you.  Sorry buddy, I’m afraid that you’re exaggerating—big time.  Unless you really do deserve to be canned—I’m giving you benefit of the doubt because we’re friends, right?—you have come across the one disgruntled customer in a pool of millions who probably wants everyone (s)he interacts with removed from the general vicinity.

beautiful  customer  service  operator  woman with headset and smiling ,one hand touching the headset and the other hand show to ok sign, asian woman
beautiful customer service operator woman with headset and smiling ,one hand touching the headset and the other hand show to ok sign, asian woman

The big thing to take home from this concept: people are all different, and therefore customers are all different.  Never let one (or two, maybe three) angry customers set the standard for all customers.  Customers, in general, are not out to get you.  Chances are they probably won’t even remember you (not an ideal situation, but it’s a reality).  So unless you really deserve it, a small handful of disgruntled customers angry with the world aren’t going to cost you a job.